The Bluest Eye

The Bluest Eye

Book - 1994
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THE BLUEST EYE chronicles the tragic, torn lives of a poor black family in 1940s Ohio: Pauline, Cholly, Sam and Pecola. Pecola, unlovely and unloved, prays each night for blue eyes like those of her privileged blond white schoolfellows. She becomes the focus of the mingled love and hatred engendered by her family's frailty and the world's cruelty as the novel moves toward a savage but poignant resolution.
Publisher: London : Picador in association with Chatto & Windus, 1994.
Branch Call Number: FICTION
Characteristics: 173 p. ;,20 cm.
Custom Field2: Reissue with a new afterword.

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From the critics


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p
peacebenow
Oct 19, 2020

If you ever want to understand how poverty can kill the spirit of people, you just need to read this book. Ms Morrison packs a lot of information into how people see themselves, see others and people who don't have that vision. How a lack of positive role models can destroy a child and a community in varying degrees. Easy for a mean spirit to rear its head and for people take comfort in forbidden or misplaced spaces. Powerful writing.

m
Magicworld
Oct 12, 2020

I don’t think I’ve read anything like The Bluest Eye. A book so poetic and so profoundly sorrowful at the same time. Whatever I write here will only barely scratch the surface and show how much I still have to understand about it.
The story is centered around Pecola and her seemingly impossible dream to have blue eyes. It's a story brimming with deep-rooted trauma, cruelty towards the most vulnerable, a vicious circle of violence and different forms of ugliness. It opens doors that are better left closed and shines light on the darkest corners of the human soul. It is a desperate search for beauty and love, drowned in helplessness, poverty and misery. It's a story that breaks your heart, educates and enlightens.
I feel humbled and devastated after reading it. Thank you, Toni Morrison!

k
kaseybreda
Aug 22, 2020

205 pages

b
bobpruner
Aug 14, 2020

Not an easy read because of the subject matter, narrative style, time juxtapositions and complex language but a worthwhile read if you want to get a glimpse of what it was like to be a black woman in the 1960's and earlier. We rarely get such a unique perspective from the bulk of literature from that time or even today. The author's afterword at the end of this book is helpful in providing the necessary context and gives a better understanding of the nuances and purpose of her work.

e
eringwong
Jul 21, 2020

Hard read, but beautiful and worth it

l
lukasevansherman
Apr 13, 2020

Toni Morrison's first novel, published in 1970.

p
patcarstensen
Mar 25, 2020

A grand saga of Black experience in 200 pages. Also excellent portrayal of weather affected by Lake Erie (-:

b
britneym
Aug 16, 2019

This book was a bit much for me. The author did a good job in revealing other POV without showing any bias or trying to sway the reader in any way. However, I had to skip over a part of the book because I didn’t feel comfortable being in the mind of a pedofile. I took a few breaks while reading this to refocus just because there were so many different situations and serious topics being addressed. I felt sad about what happened to Pecola because I feel like she was the purest character and she was so broken at the end. All in all, Good writing style, and a very realistic depiction of several dysfunctional lifestyles.

k
Kelisharkey
Aug 12, 2019

Can we get a Play Away please 🙏🏼.

g
gaiasworld
Aug 08, 2019

Please get more copies..e books and regular ,since so many people want to read this book.

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Age Suitability

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b
britneym
Aug 16, 2019

britneym thinks this title is suitable for 17 years and over

m
mayog
Dec 20, 2018

mayog thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

r
ranvapa
Nov 20, 2018

ranvapa thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

g
grace0130
Jun 29, 2012

grace0130 thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

EuSei Jun 03, 2011

EuSei thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

2
21221010888029
Mar 13, 2010

21221010888029 thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Notices

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m
mayog
Dec 20, 2018

Frightening or Intense Scenes: rape; other violent scenes including a near-death scene

m
mayog
Dec 20, 2018

Sexual Content: rape; consensual sex; prostitution

m
mayog
Dec 20, 2018

Coarse Language: use of the "n" word

m
mayog
Dec 20, 2018

Violence: rape, other forms of violence including the death of two animals.

EuSei Jun 03, 2011

Coarse Language: This title contains Coarse Language.

EuSei Jun 03, 2011

Sexual Content: This title contains Sexual Content.

Quotes

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m
mayog
Dec 20, 2018

“Along with the idea of romantic love, she was introduced to another--physical beauty. Probably the most destructive ideas in the history of human thought. Both originated in envy, thrived in insecurity, and ended in disillusion.”

m
mayog
Dec 20, 2018

And fantasy it was, for we were not strong, only aggressive; we were not free, merely licensed; we were not compassionate, we were polite; not good, but well behaved. We courted death in order to call ourselves brave, and hid like thieves from life. We substituted good grammar for intellect; we switched habits to simulate maturity; we rearranged lies and called it truth, seeing in the new pattern of an old idea the Revelation and the Word.”

m
mayog
Dec 20, 2018

All of our waste which we dumped on her and which she absorbed. And all of our beauty, which was hers first and which she gave to us. All of us--all who knew her--felt so wholesome after we cleaned ourselves on her. We were so beautiful when we stood astride her ugliness. her simplicity decorated us, her guilt sanctified us, her pain made us glow with health, her awkwardness made us think we has a sense of humor. Her inarticulateness made us believe we were eloquent. Her poverty kept us generous. Even her waking dreams we used--to silence our own nightmares. And she let us, and thereby deserved our contempt. We honed our egos on her, padded our characters with her frailty, and yawned in the fantasy of our strength.

Blue_Baboon_132 Aug 20, 2012

THE BLUEST EYE

tt14 Jun 18, 2012

“He stood up and in a vexed whiny voice shouted at Cholly, ‘Tell that bitch she get her money and get the fuck out of here!’”

Summary

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m
mayog
Dec 20, 2018

The novel relates the "how" if not the "why" of the rape of Pecola Breedlove and her subsequent descent into madness, characterized by her fantasy of her having blue eyes.

To do so, it traces each of the characters through their experiences of racism and the internalized self-hatred produced by racism, and shows how each of these leads to Pecola's abuse by the entire community of Lorien, Ohio and her rape by her father.

The novel, in so doing, peels back the curtain on the devastating impact of internalized racism.

Blue_Baboon_132 Aug 20, 2012

LIFE!!!

tt14 Jul 26, 2012

In the novel The Bluest Eye, the most significant example of a person having low self-esteem is Pecola. In The Bluest Eye, the reader learns that Pecola was raped and impregnated by her father in the family kitchen. Toni Morrison describes Cholly’s thoughts at the time of the rape as being excited. The narrator, Claudia, comments, “...the silence of her stunned throat was better than Pauline’s easy laughter had been” (Morrison 162). Pecola’s silence is an example of her being powerless and a contributing factor to her low self-esteem. Pecola feels that her future is hopeless and she feels betrayed by the rape at the hands of her father. This is not how a father is supposed to treat his daughter. A father should talk to his daughter, give her advice, and make her feel that she is worth something. Pecola feels alone and powerless and that she can not trust anyone.

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