White Teeth

White Teeth

Book - 2000
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At the centre of this invigorating novel are two unlikely friends, Archie Jones and Samad Iqbal. Hapless veterans of World War II, Archie and Samad and their families become agents of England's irrevocable transformation. A second marriage to Clara Bowden, a beautiful, albeit tooth-challenged, Jamaican half his age, quite literally gives Archie a second lease on life, and produces Irie, a knowing child whose personality doesn't quite match her name (Jamaican for "no problem"). Samad's late-in-life arranged marriage (he had to wait for his bride to be born), produces twin sons whose separate paths confound Iqbal's every effort to direct them, and a renewed, if selective, submission to his Islamic faith. Set against London' s racial and cultural tapestry, venturing across the former empire and into the past as it barrels toward the future, White Teeth revels in the ecstatic hodgepodge of modern life, flirting with disaster, confounding expectations, and embracing the comedy of daily existence.
Publisher: London : Hamish Hamilton, 2000.
Branch Call Number: FICTION
Characteristics: 461 p. ;,24 cm.
Notes: Winner of the 2000 James Tait Black Memorial Prize.

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j
jobacklund
Jun 12, 2020

Author recommended by Mickie.

r
Robvkam
Jan 12, 2020

Quirky and novel at first but once you've had a few pages of the eclectic conversational style and grating cynicism about every person on earth, it becomes a slog. I skipped the middle third and couldn't even get interested in the ending. I developed not a single care for any character.

m
mini_moon_pie
Jun 04, 2019

I found White Teeth easy to follow and thought about it when I was working. It’s only near the end that things get a little muddled, but a big reveal is a twist you won’t see coming. However, I wouldn’t read White Teeth for any twists, but the pleasurable storytelling style.

s
Suelogeman
Oct 14, 2018

I enjoyed this book from a multicultural aspect and the characters were realistic going through their journey of life. I did not find closure with the ending and would not recommend this book.

z
Zedd
Sep 04, 2018

I did not enjoy this book, and had to make myself finish it. It was about three cultures and three families over three generations. The characters were irritating, the language was too repetitive and drawn out, and the ending was incomplete and irrelevant to all the information presented in the book. I would not recommend it to anyone.

b
beetlebaily
May 06, 2018

Excellent book. Extremely well written. Debut novel. Characters diverse and extraordinarily well crafted. Definitely worth reading.

f
Folly
Oct 18, 2017

A fantastic story that is wonderfully constructed and written. The story looks at ties (family, religion, culture, country) and the author manages to look at them from all sides without judgement. At times I was wondering where the story was headed as threads seemed to be left dangling but the author never let go of any of them. Superb. One of the best books I've read for quite a while.

e
emilyhcox
Mar 27, 2017

Richly complex novel touching on themes of familial bonds and their legacies through a kaleidoscope of imperfect characters.

m
Margush
Sep 13, 2016

Having read this book, I ended up reading everything I could find about its author, Zadie Smith. I wanted to know more about someone who has such an amazing linguistic talent and a great sense of British humour while describing serious matters. For the first time those raving reviews on its back cover didn't disappoint.

t
talltimt
Feb 11, 2016

What a superb debut (2000) novel! I want to call it hilarious, but it delivers no knee-slapping guffaws, just sustained satirical irony lampooning everything, East and West, from war and religion to the use of language, both academic (e.g. those “strange French men who think truth is a function of language”) and every-day (e.g. the ridiculous PC and bureaucratic manipulators of language: “Mr. De Winter, a Polish night watchman--that’s what he calls himself—his job title is Asset Security Coordinator)” to recombinant DNA technology. The story involves three families, often going back generations but focusing on the nuclear families that split apart like bombarded atoms: a middle-aged man of virtually no ability whatsoever who marries a 20-something, otherwise beautiful, half-breed Jamaican with no upper teeth; his best friend, a one-armed Pakistani waiter, his stupid shrew of a wife, and their twin sons who are as different as a London street thug turned religious zealot and a brilliant, Oxbridge-like, polite and charming would-be lawyer; and a “perfect” neo-hippy family of superior intellect, sophistication, and hospitality, the father being the gene manipulator and the mother a self-proclaimed, world-class gardener. As an example of her self-awareness and family insight, I quote: Mother: “But everybody loves [the obnoxious one of the twins], don’t they Oscar (her 5 y/o son)! It’s so hard not to, isn’t it, Oscar? We love him, don’t we, Oscar?” Oscar: “I hate him.” Mother: “Oh, Oscar, don’t say silly things.” That captures the relationship of these two family members as well as illustrating the mother’s blithe way of interacting with the world as she wants it to be, however false to reality. Still, we can’t help loving (most) of these idiots as they stumble through each others’ lives and laughing (or at least chuckling) all the way to an unfortunately unsatisfying conclusion. But how could the farcical story of such a weird mélange of boobs ever be concluded and remain within the scope of its satire? The book just simply has to stop, which is pretty much what it does, but we know that their story just keeps going . . . on . . . and on . . . and on.

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Kristin_M_M Apr 06, 2016

Some secrets are permanent. In a vision, Irie has seen a time, a time not far from now, when roots won't matter any more because they can't because they musn't because they're too long and they're too tortuous and they're just buried too damn deep. She looks forward to it.

Kristin_M_M Apr 06, 2016

'It's Science.' Archie says Science the same way he says Modern, as if someone has lent him the words and made him swear not to break them. 'Science,' Archie repeats, handling it more firmly, 'is a different kettle of fish.'

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